Ex-Japanese PM on How Fukushima Meltdown was Worse Than Chernobyl & Why He Now Opposes Nuclear Power

Comment aider le Japon

Three years ago today a massive earthquake triggered a devastating tsunami that struck Japan’s northeast coast, resulting in an unprecedented nuclear crisis: a triple meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station. As Japan marks the anniversary with continued uncertainty around Fukushima’s long-term impact, we are joined by Naoto Kan, Japan’s prime minister at the time. It’s rare that a sitting world leader changes his position completely, but that’s what Kan has done. He explains how he came to oppose nuclear power while still in office, as he weighed Tokyo’s evacuation. « It’s impossible to totally prevent any kind of accident or disaster happening at the nuclear power plants, » Kan says. « And so, the one way to prevent this from happening, to prevent the risk of having to evacuate such huge amounts of people, 50 million people, and for the purpose, for the benefit of the lives of our people, and even the economy of Japan, I came to change the position, that the only way to do this was to totally get rid of the nuclear power plants. »

See on www.democracynow.org


Fukushima: une partie des réfugiés pourront retourner chez eux – Sciences et Avenir

Comment aider le Japon

Fukushima: une partie des réfugiés pourront retourner chez eux Sciences et Avenir Le Japon va lever un ordre d’exclusion portant sur une zone proche de la centrale nucléaire de Fukushima, ce qui va permettre à des réfugiés de retourner chez eux,…
See on www.sciencesetavenir.fr


«A Fukushima, seulement le silence et le croassement des corbeaux» – JOL Press

Comment aider le Japon ?

JOL Press «A Fukushima, seulement le silence et le croassement des corbeaux» JOL Press Trois ans après la catastrophe nucléaire de Fukushima, le gouvernement nippon va lever un ordre d’exclusion sur une zone proche de la centrale…
www.jolpress.com

Ailleurs au Japon, pas de nouvelles de Fukushima non plus.